Monday 19 November 2018

Clean Water Advocacy (27)

Regulator has missed Safe Drinking Water Act deadlines for toxic and carcinogenic contaminants WASHINGTON, D.C. - Waterkeeper Alliance, Waterkeepers Chesapeake, and California Coastkeeper Alliance today notified the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of their intent to sue the agency under the Safe Drinking Water Act because EPA has missed Safe Drinking Water Act deadlines for reviewing and regulating drinking water contaminants, including tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, hexavalent chromium, and others. The environmental groups are represented in this matter by Reed W. Super, Esq. of Super Law Group, LLC. EPA’s mandatory obligations under the Safe Drinking Water Act include identifying unregulated contaminants for monitoring and/or regulation, regulating those contaminants, and reviewing and revising existing drinking water regulations, all according to a specific timetable mandated by Congress. If EPA does not perform its mandatory obligations, we plan to file suit in early 2019. The mandatory duties the groups intend to enforce in the upcoming lawsuit involve particular contaminants: Chromium (including hexavalent chromium, the chemical best known from the movie “Erin Brockovich”) was regulated in 1991, with an enforceable limit of 100 parts per billion, based on the assumption that it was noncarcinogenic through oral exposure even though it is known to cause cancer when inhaled. Since then, the National Toxicology Program found “clear evidence of carcinogenic activity” when hexavalent chromium is ingested in drinking water. California set a goal of 0.2 parts per billion and an enforceable limit of 10 parts per billion. EPA has been studying it for many years but has not…
Last week, the scandal-ridden EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned. We, along with other environmental groups, rejoiced in his resignation – but unfortunately our work to stop rollbacks of environmental protections and to fight the take over of the EPA by the fossil fuels industry is not over. The likely new head of the EPA, Andrew Wheeler, is expected to be just as bad as Pruitt, and maybe worse given his expertise in navigating the federal legislative and regulatory spheres. Clean water is essential for the health and sustainability of our families, communities and environment. Lest we forget -- we all live downstream. We have a responsibility, as a nation, to control pollution at its source and protect the drinking water sources of all residents – regardless of where they live. Here are two examples of direct assaults on our clean water and drinking water resources and how we are joining fights against these outrageous threats to your health and your communities. Clean Water Rule In 2015, the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers passed the Clean Water Rule, resulting in better protections for a variety of streams, ponds, and wetlands that were vulnerable to pollution. Waterkeepers Chesapeake submitted comments that were supportive of the rule’s passage. The Rule was based on sound science and received broad public support. Despite this  -- last year, President Trump urged the EPA to repeal the 2015 Clean Water Rule. This rule would rollback the new definition, reverting us back to the less protective definitions of Waters…
The Waterkeepers and Riverkeepers in our coalition are vigilantly working to make the waters of the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays swimmable and fishable. Together, the Waterkeepers Chesapeake network patrols thousands of miles of tributaries and shorelines throughout the Chesapeake and Coastal Bays, and are at the forefront of water quality related enforcement and advocacy efforts in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Earlier this month we shared our legislative victories in Maryland. Here’s what you need to know about the 2018 Virginia and Pennsylvania (so far) legislative sessions. In Virginia, from January to March this year the James Riverkeeper and others worked hard to protect oyster sanctuaries across the state. Fortunately, they were successful in defeating a bill which would have placed these invaluable sanctuaries at risk (for the second year in a row!). Next week, Virginia will be considering its state budget - with a proposal from Governor McAuliffe that supports the Virginia Land Conservation Foundation, Virginia Outdoors Foundation and Environmental Education. There are also multiple proposals from the Senate, like $20 million for the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund and funding for oyster restoration and replenishment, that we are supportive of. Find out more about the Virginia’s budget proposals here.   Potomac Riverkeeper joined James Riverkeeper to address the threats associated with coal ash in the Virginia legislature. They successfully advocated for the passage of Senate Bill 807, which prevents the Virginia Department from Environmental Quality (DEQ) from issuing any new coal ash solid waste permits at Dominion until July 1, 2019.…